silence

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I suspect my current rebellion is about wanting to stop the conversation, and listen, see, feel, touch, smell - do the gut thing.

experiments with vector (digital drawing)
the end result will be an interactive work called 'submit'

selfProtraitStudy.jpg
anni I really enjoy the images, please enlighten me about the title? It's intriguing.

katty I want to build an interactive work of this drawing - you see there's already one title in called 'god's window' which points to the eye's pupil (bottom RHS pic) - I want to build a form where you as browser get to fill in the remaining fields (the white boxes) - in order to send the info to me, you have to then click the 'submit' button - I'm trying to play with the notion that god is within us, and that 'he' looks through our eyes onto the rest of the world - it then poses the question (or tries to) - if this is god's window, what is the rest? 'submit' then asks the browser to submit the information they've entered, but in a way they're also asking the depiction to submit to their notion of what it means to think, smell, feel, taste, hear, take it on the chin, voice etc... I'm trying to play with the subconscious response... in a sense, god's perception is filtered by what we experience and how we process information (I'm referring to the universal god - whatever or whoever that is for whomever) rough thoughts still - I've added the tabs at the top thinking I might alter the states of mind or something - haven't thought that one through yet...

anni I love the idea of the top tabs giving different states of mind. I didn't get the idea of 'god' in all of us through the 'god's window' bit, more that the artist is god in this environment - it probably has to do with the way we do not necessarily identify with the image, but see it as 'other', i. e. expression of the artist's self. I also think that in order to get people to submit their interpretations, you might need to entice them a little - give them options of eyes, facial features to put in, and add more of your own words. At this stage there is too much that the person looking at the art has to do. Just looking with intent is already an effort for most of us. I'm afraid the video-game has taught us all to look for the reward for doing something - a little jingle, a change, a roll-over button... You've already got a whole series of images of that portrait. Maybe they should not all be visible at once, but different variations can be revealed as you activate a 'submission'. The word 'submit' is very powerful. It has wonderful ambiguous connotations. Excellent title. Thus the commentary of an.

katty thanks for the feedback, when I first thought of the idea, I was incredibly impressed with myself, but when I came back to it, I kinda struggled to remember what the original idea was - what you've said makes me understand that I need to be more explicit and purposeful in my meaning...
I'm just back from a trans_end meeting with Diek Grobler and Jaco van den Heever and I'm getting better at translating the web in terms of art work and art process. The web offers a set of limitations that takes process and concept into a different direction and opens up a different way of thinking about the same subject matter.

In the same way that paper surface and charcoal set up a set of limitations and possibilities, an artist learns to work within those limitations and manipulate them to maximum effect. The process and medium and the artists' relationship with that is where the magic of delivery happens.

These monthly meetings are powerful in that they offer an opportunity for a few individuals to engage on a specific topic. Everytime a different set of individuals arrive, and it's wonderful to sit down and engage on how their particular work or process can translate into the web.

I've come to understand that my role in all of this needs to be that of 'creative curator'. Because I understand the technical paradigm that I'm setting up here (HTML), I need to be the translator of the artists' work into this space. In order to accomplish this, I will have to sit down with individual artists one at a time and discuss their particular medium, process and concept. I can then transpose that into the technical framework and possibilities of this trans_end space and feed that back into the artists' process. Those who are in other geographical spaces will have to connect via mail or skype.

What this means at the end of the day, is that I will be building the final online artwork in virtual space for each artist without technical know-how who is prepared to submit themselves to the process. A bigger task than I had originally intended, but one I've come to realise as necessary. Much like a gallery curator who orchestrates the exhibition space, I will have to play the role of digital curator/collaborator... but the kind of curation that retranslates the work and weaves it into cyberspace to such an extent that it cannot be replicated in a physical sense. The artworks' physical manifestation will be a different presentation of the same subject matter.

Once the physical exhibition is up, it will become crucial to document that and to add it to the trans_end website. So, at the end of the day, online visitors will be able to experience a sense of both, and the exhibition can transcend the boundaries of now.

To date our studio blog activity has been low and slow. But I do hope that as discussion and art process takes hold, more conversation, process and artwork will manifest itself here.

If you're ready to engage with me, be sure to contact me! Visit the cone (invitation) > participants' page to source my details.

portraiture

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If there is one reason that motivated me to pursue a career in art, it would have to percolate to one particular process: that of portraiture. As far as the trans_end theme goes, a friend pointed out that a portrait is something that transcends time, that leaves a legacy, a record of a moment captured by one individual of another - and left for subsequent generations to absorb. As a digital artist, portraiture holds particular fascination. The act of two people meeting in a place in order for one to record the other sets up a temporary relationship that has always intrigued me. It is the intimacy of the act, the sense of vulnerability, the undercurrent energies captured in the spirit and psychology that has particular appeal. Much like a momentary sex act. Art has a longstanding heritage of portraiture, and as a digital artist I intend to further that legacy.

If anyone has delved into portraiture as a subject, I would welcome some discussion around the topic.

I is we...

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in a way it is the group that collectively blesses, or curses us... and it is our agreement with, or rebellion against, that enacts either or... and this group is formed not only by those who we live amongst, but also those who have passed amongst us...

all my family members that have died, that I have memory or knowledge of, or they of me - all those that are connected to us through love or guilt - they live in who we are - influence our thoughts, inform our souls...

my paternal grandfather, whom I never knew, lives in me through my father's love for him, and my father's loss of him at the age of 11 - simply because this single experience shattered his life into what he could've been, and what he did become... through him I carry that burden, and the love for his father before me...

this is why it is so incredibly important to find a place of understanding and position - because in the end, it is yourself you are getting to know that much better... and forgive.

no matter how much we disagree and judge our heritage, we have to somehow embrace and own it - we have to feed back into the loop the better wisdom and judgement we can bring - when we speak, not only do we shape the minds of those who have ears - but we also debate those who are souls - those who look after us when our minds wander and our eyes sleep...

immortal

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Turning 40 turns something on inside one that tends to send out a sense of panic. Luckily I stepped back a few years ago and reassessed my life and depressions and made some steady but fundamental changes. These days I find myself trying to stitch back what I tore apart as a younger person. It has also made me think a lot more about existence, where it begins, and where it ends, if it ever does. In that sense trans_end (transcend) finds me at the perfect moment to play with these notions as an artist.

One thing we do have is a definate fascination with death and everything that represents it. The following sketch experiment grew out of my discovering a very much dessicated and cleaned up ghecko underneath one of my shelves when I moved my studio around. I kept it in a plastic container for about two years, carefully moving it here then there and gingerly dusting off the box in case any of the fragile bones disintegrated. I eventually decided to commit the remains to scan and bumped into them the other day... I decided it was time to resurrect the ghecko -

immortal link

immortalClip.jpg




hurricane_lantern

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A hurricane lantern is a wonderful symbolic image for how I'm feeling about this quest into our next journey. In many ways the internet is still a largely unexplored territory by artists as a venue of experimentation and expression. Our theme 'trans_end', implies the exploration of the apocalypse myth, but the threshold gap between 'trans' (change) and 'end' (apocalypse) also holds hope if one inserts the missing 'c' - to 'transcend', to rise above...

leaflet.jpg



the garden lady

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I think of this blog as my scrapbook - a place to experiment and play... this weekend I found myself at a wonderful new garden centre with a new addition to the garden gnome variety... as a women I of course find these garden props absolutely insulting... as an artist they tickle my funny bone and I had to have some fun with them... the originals are life size, for your pleasure...

potLady2.gif
fountainLady2.gif


















I then went to play with them in html... here is what I explained to a friend...

"...more than anything I'm playing technical games and experimenting with techniques - I'm very excited about the potential of what I'm doing - animations without a single video or flash movie in sight... I can now animate backgrounds and foregrounds with incredibly little pixel power - for example, my animated background (jumping lines) consists of an animated gif that is 1 x 1000 pixel in size - it duplicates itself up automatically to produce the illusion of a full background of jumping lines, when in fact they're only single pixels skipping about...

i guess that all means very little to you - and so many people looking won't twig to the technical aspects lying below - but it sets up a kind of restriction on what I can accomplish, and will therefore generate a recognisable 'style' and focus my attention in terms of technique... I love the visuality of what I'm doing - the repetition and structure - it references the predominent visual language of the web, and that's what I'm trying to achieve as an web artist... for me video and flash are cop-outs to what the web is really made of - code..."

the fountain lady
the pot lady